Apologies for the late notice, but I wanted to let you know that we have a few spots left in "Improving Library Services to People with Disabilities", an online course offered by ASCLA (the Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies).

This course is an excellent opportunity to review how your library is currently serving its users with disabilities, and subsequently explore ways to improve those services.

Specifically, those who take this course will:
---> identify patrons with disabilities who use the library and the resources that are available to assist them.
---> examine changes in attitudes, laws and technologies that have impacted people with disabilities.
---> demonstrate communication with people-first language and non-verbal techniques.
---> recommend changes in personal and organizational behaviors to improve services for people with disabilities.

*******The course begins on Monday, however we are leaving registration open through close of business on Monday.*******
The course runs Jan. 30 - Feb. 24, 2012.
There is one live course meeting: Thursday, February 9, 2012 from 3pm-4pm CENTRAL/Chicago Time
The remainder of the coursework is at your own pace.

Register now here: http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

More course information is here: http://www.ala.org/ascla/asclaevents/onlinelearning/libraryservices

Group discounts? Why yes, we offer group discounts! :o) Two or more individuals from the same library, library system or network registering for this offering constitute a group. More information about how to take advantage of this is here: http://www.ala.org/ascla/asclaevents/onlinelearning/onlinelearning

Questions? Contact [log in to unmask]

I encourage you to share this message with colleagues or distribution lists that may find it of interest.
Thanks in advance for your help and your interest!


**********************************
Liz Markel
Marketing & Programs Manager, RUSA & ASCLA

------_=_NextPart_001_01CCDD24.755B3445-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2012 18:18:03 +0000 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: "WILLIAMS, ROBERT" <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Revised CFP: History Pre-Conference X-To: asis-l <[log in to unmask]>, sighfis-l <[log in to unmask]> Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="_000_017E1E8EE0E8524888DC1DEAABCBACC50A63BBCAE145EMBP04dssce_" MIME-Version: 1.0 --_000_017E1E8EE0E8524888DC1DEAABCBACC50A63BBCAE145EMBP04dssce_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Pre-Conference on the History of ASIST and Information Science and Technology Worldwide Call for Papers (Revised 1/27/2012) The 75th Anniversary Task Force of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) announces a call for papers for the 2012 Pre-Conference on the history of ASIST and the history of information science and technology worldwide. The Pre-Conference will be held immediately prior to the 2012 Annual Meeting of ASIST, Oct. 26-31, 2012, in Baltimore, Maryland. This conference will explore the 75 year history of ASIST and the longer history of information science and technology worldwide. Abstracts of papers (maximum 1,000 words) not previously published or submitted elsewhere should be submitted by March 1, 2012 and authors of tentatively accepted papers will be promptly notified. Full acceptance of papers will be based on receipt of the complete paper, which should be received no later than June 1, 2012. Alternative presentations, such as videos, posters, exhibits, and demonstration of historical information technologies, are also encouraged. All submissions will be refereed by a panel of experts and all accepted papers will be published as a Web-based publication prior to the conference. Submissions by students and authors outside the U.S. are particularly encouraged. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following: --The development of the foundational ideas and theories of information science and its earlier name, documentation. --What forces contributed to shaping the research agenda and scope of the field of information science worldwide over the past 75 years and how will they evolve over the next 75 years. --The major researchers and developers of the ideas, practices, and theories in information science and closely related fields of study. --The evolution of the multifaceted and multiple-named field referred to as information science with a focus on what the past says about the future of information science research and development. --Treatment of the origin and evolution of information science ideas and practices specific to an individual country. --The historical contexts of major technological innovations and the impacts they have had on societies, organizations, governments, or individuals worldwide. --The development of ASIST (and its predecessors, the American Documentation Institute, the American Society for Information Science) as a professional organization and scholarly society in context with its times, relationships with competing or affiliated organizations, major contributions and influences on the study of information science worldwide, forces shaping the research agenda and scope of the field, roles and contributions of specific individuals or groups within and outside of ASIST, and related issues. --The role of government (nationally or internationally) in influencing the development of information science and technology, with particular attention to the support of research and development of information policies. -- The development of information science education and its relationships with other fields of study, such as Library Science, Informatics, Archival Science, Museum Studies, and related specializations (such as information ethics, information architecture, geographic information systems or medical informatics). For more information and questions about this call for papers contact Robert V. Williams at [log in to unmask] or call 803-777-2324. Submit abstract (maximum of 1,000 words) electronically to the following site, completing the required contact information: http://www.softconf.com/asist2/Hist_Pre_Con/ --_000_017E1E8EE0E8524888DC1DEAABCBACC50A63BBCAE145EMBP04dssce_ Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Pre-Conference on the History of ASIST and Information Science and Technology Worldwide

Call for Papers (Revised 1/27/2012)

The 75th Anniversary Task Force of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) announces a call for papers for the 2012 Pre-Conference on the history of ASIST and the history of information science and technology worldwide. The Pre-Conference will be held immediately prior to the 2012 Annual Meeting of ASIST, Oct. 26-31, 2012, in Baltimore, Maryland.

This conference will explore the 75 year history of ASIST and the longer history of information science and technology worldwide. Abstracts of papers (maximum 1,000 words) not previously published or submitted elsewhere should be submitted by March  1, 2012 and authors of tentatively accepted papers will be promptly notified. Full acceptance of papers will be based on receipt of the complete paper, which should be received no later than June 1, 2012. Alternative presentations, such as videos, posters, exhibits, and demonstration of historical information technologies, are also encouraged.  All submissions will be refereed by a panel of experts and all accepted papers will be published as a Web-based publication prior to the conference. Submissions by students and authors outside the U.S. are particularly encouraged.

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

--The development of the foundational ideas and theories of information science and its earlier name, documentation.

--What forces contributed to shaping the research agenda and scope of the field of information science worldwide over the past 75 years and how will they evolve over the next 75 years.

--The major researchers and developers of the ideas, practices, and theories in information science and closely related fields of study. 

--The evolution of the multifaceted and multiple-named field referred to as information science with a focus on what the past says about the future of information science research and development.

--Treatment of the origin and evolution of information science ideas and practices specific to an individual country.

--The historical contexts of major technological innovations and the impacts they have had on societies, organizations, governments, or individuals worldwide.

--The development of ASIST (and its predecessors, the American Documentation Institute, the American Society for Information Science) as a professional organization and scholarly society in context with its times, relationships with competing or affiliated organizations, major contributions and influences on the study of information science worldwide, forces shaping the research agenda and scope of the field, roles and contributions of specific individuals or groups within and outside of ASIST, and related issues.

--The role of government (nationally or internationally) in influencing the development of information science and technology, with particular attention to the support of research and development of information policies.

-- The development of information science education and its relationships with other fields of study, such as Library Science, Informatics, Archival Science, Museum Studies, and related specializations (such as information ethics, information architecture, geographic information systems or medical informatics).

For more information and questions about this call for papers contact Robert V. Williams at [log in to unmask] or call 803-777-2324.

Submit abstract (maximum of 1,000 words) electronically to the following site, completing the required contact information: http://www.softconf.com/asist2/Hist_Pre_Con/

 

 

--_000_017E1E8EE0E8524888DC1DEAABCBACC50A63BBCAE145EMBP04dssce_-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2012 18:50:45 +0000 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: "Mallette, Michelle" <[log in to unmask]> Subject: UBC Faculty & Student Research Featured Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="_000_6096D52ADC095045B74A779B38EB59C0D86C4081SITSVMBX01Peadu_" MIME-Version: 1.0 --_000_6096D52ADC095045B74A779B38EB59C0D86C4081SITSVMBX01Peadu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable News from the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, The iSchool at The University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada The work of faculty and students at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, The iSchool at The University of British Columbia, is gaining some national and international attention. The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada has chosen to feature faculty member Dr. Luciana Duranti's research in its spotlight on The University of British Columbia. One of three projects featured for UBC, the article notes the work involves developing guidelines "for the creation, maintenance and preservation of digital records." The article then provides a link for readers to learn more at Dr. Duranti's research page on the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council site. SSHRC is the Canadian federal agency that promotes and supports postsecondary-based research and training in the humanities and social sciences. Just across the border from us, The Canadian Studies Center has featured Fulbright Scholar Jill Woelfer, a visiting graduate student this year at the iSchool, on its website. Jill is a PhD candidate at the University of Washington iSchool, where she is investigating the socio-technical aspects of information systems, studying the experiences people have using facebook or mobile applications. The site links to a full article on her research. For those who receive messages in plain text only, here at the URLs for the above articles: http://www.aucc.ca/policy-issues/research-and-innovation/new-in-research/research-profiles/?univs[]=3020 http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/society-societe/stories-histoires/story-histoire-eng.aspx?story_id=92 http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/ http://jsis.washington.edu/canada//file/Woelfer%20Article%20Canadian%20Studies%20Center%281%29.pdf Michelle -- Michelle Mallette MLIS Student Services Coordinator | School of Library, Archival & Information Studies The iSchool at The University of British Columbia | Irving K. Barber Learning Centre 470 - 1961 East Mall, Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z1 e: [log in to unmask] | t: 604.822.2461 (direct) | skype: mmallette.ubc www.slais.ubc.ca | www.facebook.com/UBC.SLAIS | @slaisubc Applying to SLAIS? Join our virtual admissions open house. --_000_6096D52ADC095045B74A779B38EB59C0D86C4081SITSVMBX01Peadu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

News from the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, The iSchool at The University of British Columbia

Vancouver, Canada

 

The work of faculty and students at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, The iSchool at The University of British Columbia, is gaining some national and international attention.

The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada has chosen to feature faculty member Dr. Luciana Duranti's research in its spotlight on The University of British Columbia. One of three projects featured for UBC, the article notes the work involves developing guidelines "for the creation, maintenance and preservation of digital records.” The article then provides a link for readers to learn more at Dr. Duranti's research page on the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council site. SSHRC is the Canadian federal agency that promotes and supports postsecondary-based research and training in the humanities and social sciences.

 

Just across the border from us, The Canadian Studies Center has featured Fulbright Scholar Jill Woelfer, a visiting graduate student this year at the iSchool, on its website. Jill is a PhD candidate at the University of Washington iSchool, where she is investigating the socio-technical aspects of information systems, studying the experiences people have using facebook or mobile applications. The site links to a full article on her research.

 

For those who receive messages in plain text only, here at the URLs for the above articles:

http://www.aucc.ca/policy-issues/research-and-innovation/new-in-research/research-profiles/?univs[]=3020

http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/society-societe/stories-histoires/story-histoire-eng.aspx?story_id=92

http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/

http://jsis.washington.edu/canada//file/Woelfer%20Article%20Canadian%20Studies%20Center%281%29.pdf

 

 

Michelle

--

Michelle Mallette MLIS

Student Services Coordinator | School of Library, Archival & Information Studies

The iSchool at The University of British Columbia | Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

470 – 1961 East Mall, Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z1

e: [log in to unmask]  | t: 604.822.2461 (direct) | skype: mmallette.ubc

www.slais.ubc.ca  | www.facebook.com/UBC.SLAIS | @slaisubc

Applying to SLAIS? Join our virtual admissions open house.

 

 

 

--_000_6096D52ADC095045B74A779B38EB59C0D86C4081SITSVMBX01Peadu_-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2012 16:29:11 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: "Gruich,Dorothy D" <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Job Posting Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="_004_C791EEC05AE37A4C842E6DB0E349E8AC01142B9246AAMAILBOXuane_"; type="multipart/alternative" MIME-Version: 1.0 --_004_C791EEC05AE37A4C842E6DB0E349E8AC01142B9246AAMAILBOXuane_ Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="_000_C791EEC05AE37A4C842E6DB0E349E8AC01142B9246AAMAILBOXuane_" --_000_C791EEC05AE37A4C842E6DB0E349E8AC01142B9246AAMAILBOXuane_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Center for the History of Psychology Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist Position: The Center for the History of Psychology (CHP) at The University of Akron seeks candidates for the position of Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist. This is an excellent opportunity for professional growth for a well-qualified individual with an MLIS degree or comparable professional experience in cataloging and processing various forms of media and primary source material. This position reports directly to the Manager of Special Collections. Position Description: The Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist is responsible for performing original and complex copy cataloging of monographs as well as other material types, including altering MARC records of collections finding aids to conform to OCLC standards. In addition to cataloging, the Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist will be responsible for arranging and describing the CHP's archival collections using EAD and DACS standards, and in-house guidelines. The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, communicate effectively with others, be adaptable to changes, and foster collaboration and effective teamwork. Required Qualifications: * A relevant Master's degree (preferably in library and information science from an ALA-accredited program or an appropriate combination of experience and education). * One year experience in archival cataloging practices, and description and arrangement of primary source material * Demonstrated knowledge of standards such as AACR2, Library of Congress Rule Interpretations, Library of Congress subject headings and classification schedules Preferred Qualifications: * Experience using Millennium III and OCLC Connexion cataloging systems * Knowledge of DACS * Knowledge of media preservation and conservation methods * Knowledge of RBMS bibliographic standards Description of Organization: The Center for the History of Psychology is located on The University of Akron campus in Akron, Ohio. Founded in 1965, the CHP is the largest repository of its kind in the world, representing the various manifestations of psychology throughout its history. The first archives to achieve the Smithsonian's Affiliate status, the Center seeks to bring greater exposure to the study of the human sciences by collecting, preserving and making available primary source material in the history of psychology. Read more at www.uakron.edu/chp. For complete details and to apply for this position, visit: http://www.uakron.edu/jobs/. Requisition number: 007075. The University of Akron is committed to a policy of equal employment opportunity and to the principles of affirmative action in accordance with state and federal laws. --_000_C791EEC05AE37A4C842E6DB0E349E8AC01142B9246AAMAILBOXuane_ Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable [log in to unmask]" lang=EN-US link="#3333CC" vlink="#999999">[log in to unmask]" v:src="cid:[log in to unmask]" v:shapes="_x0000_Mail" width=0 height=0 class=shape style='display:none;width:0;height:0'>

Center for the History of Psychology

 

Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist

 

Position: The Center for the History of Psychology (CHP) at The University of Akron seeks candidates for the position of Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist. This is an excellent opportunity for professional growth for a well-qualified individual with an MLIS degree or comparable professional experience in cataloging and processing various forms of media and primary source material.  This position reports directly to the Manager of Special Collections.

 

Position Description:  The Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist is responsible for performing original and complex copy cataloging of monographs as well as other material types, including altering MARC records of collections finding aids to conform to OCLC standards.  In addition to cataloging, the Special Collections Librarian/Assistant Processing Archivist will be responsible for arranging and describing the CHP’s archival collections using EAD and DACS standards, and in-house guidelines. The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, communicate effectively with others, be adaptable to changes, and foster collaboration and effective teamwork.

 

Required Qualifications:

·         A relevant Master's degree (preferably in library and information science from an ALA-accredited program or an appropriate combination of experience and education).

·         One year experience in archival cataloging practices, and description and arrangement of primary source material

·         Demonstrated knowledge of standards such as AACR2, Library of Congress Rule Interpretations, Library of Congress subject headings and classification schedules

 

Preferred Qualifications:

·         Experience using Millennium III and OCLC Connexion cataloging systems

·         Knowledge of DACS

  • Knowledge of media preservation and conservation methods
  • Knowledge of RBMS bibliographic standards

 

Description of Organization: The Center for the History of Psychology is located on The University of Akron campus in Akron, Ohio.  Founded in 1965, the CHP is the largest repository of its kind in the world, representing the various manifestations of psychology throughout its history.  The first archives to achieve the Smithsonian’s Affiliate status, the Center seeks to bring greater exposure to the study of the human sciences by collecting, preserving and making available primary source material in the history of psychology. Read more at www.uakron.edu/chp.

 

 

For complete details and to apply for this position, visit:  http://www.uakron.edu/jobs/. Requisition number: 007075. The University of Akron is committed to a policy of equal employment opportunity and to the principles of affirmative action in accordance with state and federal laws.

 

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X-cc: Charles Seavey <[log in to unmask]> In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------010605010001080205040309" --------------010605010001080205040309 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Charley, I was a Navy carrier/land pilot who flew over 100 electronic intelligence missions in the Far East during the Cold War during the late 1950s--sometimes we had to go into enemy airspace. Later I was head communications and top secret control officer for Mayport Naval Station (also a Naval Air Station) near Jacksonville, Florida, where I did cryptographic work. Then in 1962 I was a Russian Naval Interpreter during the Cuban Blockade operations on different destroyers, oilers, and cruisers, where I turned around several Russian and other ships carrying nuclear missiles into Cuba. I also vectored several Naval aircraft on their intelligence missions over Cuba. I plan to digitize my Russian interpreter notes since they should be declassified by now. That is about it! Glynn Harmon Professor School of Information n 1/24/2012 6:44 PM, Charles Seavey wrote: > Anybody out there besides me and Brooke Shannon spent any time in > intelligence work? Armed forces, CIA, whatever? > > charley > > Charles A. Seavey, Professor > School of Library and Information Management > Emporia State University > 1200 Commercial St. > Emporia KS, 66801 > 800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct) > [log in to unmask] > > Ranganathan Said It All! --------------010605010001080205040309 Content-Type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Charley,

I was a Navy carrier/land pilot who flew over 100 electronic intelligence missions in the Far East during the Cold War during the late 1950s--sometimes we had to go into enemy airspace.

Later I was head communications and top secret control officer for Mayport Naval Station (also a Naval Air Station) near Jacksonville, Florida, where I did cryptographic work.

Then in 1962 I was a Russian Naval Interpreter during the Cuban Blockade operations on different destroyers, oilers, and cruisers, where I turned around several Russian and other ships carrying nuclear missiles into Cuba. I also vectored several Naval aircraft on their intelligence missions over Cuba.

I plan to digitize my Russian interpreter notes since they should be declassified by now.

That is about it!

Glynn Harmon
Professor
School of Information



n 1/24/2012 6:44 PM, Charles Seavey wrote:
[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
Anybody out there besides me and Brooke Shannon spent any time in intelligence work? Armed forces, CIA, whatever?

charley

Charles A. Seavey, Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
1200 Commercial St.
Emporia KS, 66801
800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct)
[log in to unmask]

Ranganathan Said It All!

--------------010605010001080205040309-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2012 12:54:31 +0000 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Charles Seavey <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Intelligence work? In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="_000_F0C0C6EE99D2D446BF06CADB3C598F38E3B7C8STINGRAYesuadds_" MIME-Version: 1.0 --_000_F0C0C6EE99D2D446BF06CADB3C598F38E3B7C8STINGRAYesuadds_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Fantastic! Definitely a book I need to look at. It appeared while I was taking my little attempt at retirement, hence I missed it. Many thanks! charley Charles A. Seavey, Professor School of Library and Information Management Emporia State University 1200 Commercial St. Emporia KS, 66801 800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct) [log in to unmask] Ranganathan Said It All! ________________________________ From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Trudi Bellardo Hahn [[log in to unmask]] Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 6:33 PM To: Charles Seavey; Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum Subject: Re: Intelligence work? The people who were on that ASIST panel, as well as others who were involved in such work during World War II and the years immediately following, contributed to a book published in 2005: Covert and Overt: Recollecting and Connecting Intelligence Service and Information Science (Asist Monograph Series), edited by Robert V. Williams and Ben-Ami Lipetz. Contributors included some names that will be familiar to many of you (although sadly, most are no longer with us): Norman Horrocks, Robert S. Taylor, David Batty, Lee Strickland, Hal Wooster, Robert Lee Chartrand, and others. You can find reviews and commentary about this book in many places on the Web, and the book is probably in your university library (or it should be!). Trudi Trudi Bellardo Hahn, MSLS, Ph.D. Professor of the Practice Maryland's i-School (College of Information Studies) Hornbake Building South 4111G University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 [log in to unmask] 301-405-2047 From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michelynn McKnight Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 9:53 AM To: [log in to unmask] Subject: Re: Intelligence work? There was a great panel presentation at ASIS&T about ten years ago featuring information scientists who had been in covert intelligence during WWII. Some were British and some US. Some were military and some were CIA or similar orgs. Two were even wearing "the old tie". It was interesting and exciting. I have my notes filed away somewhere. (I remember wishing that Wilf Lancaster - CIA I think - had been there, but he had retired from ASIS by then.) I believe that many developments we take for granted now had their origin far away from the public light of peer review and publication. Michelynn On 1/25/2012 6:13 PM, Charles Seavey wrote: George- I was really looking for folks who had some time as an intel type- several folks have come popping out of the woodwork. Come to ALISE in Seattle and, I hope and referees willing, listen to the show. charley Charles A. Seavey, Professor School of Library and Information Management Emporia State University 1200 Commercial St. Emporia KS, 66801 800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct) [log in to unmask] Ranganathan Said It All! ________________________________ From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of George R. Gaumond [[log in to unmask]] Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:12 PM To: Charles Seavey; Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum Subject: Re: Intelligence work? Depends on what part. As a Naval officer I was a communications officer for one tour, which meant that I had to attend a Naval communications school that included cryptology and other intelligence related areas. George Gaumond, Ph.D. University Librarian and Dean Emeritus Valdosta State University Library and MLIS Program ________________________________ From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Charles Seavey [[log in to unmask]] Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 7:44 PM To: [log in to unmask] Subject: Intelligence work? Anybody out there besides me and Brooke Shannon spent any time in intelligence work? Armed forces, CIA, whatever? charley Charles A. Seavey, Professor School of Library and Information Management Emporia State University 1200 Commercial St. Emporia KS, 66801 800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct) [log in to unmask] Ranganathan Said It All! -- Michelynn McKnight, PhD, AHIP Associate Professor School of Library and Information Science Louisiana State University 269 Coates Hall Baton Rouge, LA 70803 225-578-7411 Health Science Librarians: Doing better what they’ve always done well. --_000_F0C0C6EE99D2D446BF06CADB3C598F38E3B7C8STINGRAYesuadds_ Content-Type: text/html; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Fantastic! Definitely a book I need to look at. It appeared while I was taking my little attempt at retirement, hence I missed it. Many thanks!

charley

Charles A. Seavey, Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
1200 Commercial St.
Emporia KS, 66801
800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct)
[log in to unmask]

Ranganathan Said It All!

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Trudi Bellardo Hahn [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 6:33 PM
To: Charles Seavey; Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum
Subject: Re: Intelligence work?

The people who were on that ASIST panel, as well as others who were involved in such work during World War II and the years immediately following, contributed to a book published in 2005: Covert and Overt: Recollecting and Connecting Intelligence Service and Information Science (Asist Monograph Series), edited by Robert V. Williams and Ben-Ami Lipetz. 

 

Contributors included some names that will be familiar to many of you (although sadly, most are no longer with us):  Norman Horrocks, Robert S. Taylor, David Batty, Lee Strickland, Hal Wooster, Robert Lee Chartrand, and others.  You can find reviews and commentary about this book in many places on the Web, and the book is probably in your university library (or it should be!).

 

Trudi

 

Trudi Bellardo Hahn, MSLS, Ph.D.

Professor of the Practice

Maryland's i-School (College of Information Studies)

Hornbake Building South 4111G

University of Maryland

College Park, MD   20742

[log in to unmask]

301-405-2047

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michelynn McKnight
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 9:53 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Intelligence work?

 

There was a great panel presentation at ASIS&T about ten years ago featuring information scientists who had been in covert intelligence during WWII.  Some were British and some US.  Some were military and some were CIA or similar orgs.  Two were even wearing  "the old tie".  It was interesting and exciting.  I have my notes filed away somewhere.  (I remember wishing that Wilf Lancaster - CIA I think -  had been there, but he had retired from ASIS by then.)

I believe that many developments we take for granted now had their origin far away from the public light of peer review and publication.

Michelynn

On 1/25/2012 6:13 PM, Charles Seavey wrote:

George- I was really looking for folks who had some time as an intel type- several folks have come popping out of the woodwork. Come to ALISE in Seattle and, I hope and referees willing, listen to the show.

 

charley

 

Charles A. Seavey, Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
1200 Commercial St.
Emporia KS, 66801
800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct)
[log in to unmask]

Ranganathan Said It All!


From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of George R. Gaumond [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:12 PM
To: Charles Seavey; Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum
Subject: Re: Intelligence work?

Depends on what part.  As a Naval officer I was a communications officer for one tour, which meant that I had to attend a Naval communications school that included cryptology and other intelligence related areas.

 

George Gaumond, Ph.D.

University Librarian and Dean Emeritus

Valdosta State University Library and MLIS Program


From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Charles Seavey [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 7:44 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Intelligence work?

Anybody out there besides me and Brooke Shannon spent any time in intelligence work? Armed forces, CIA, whatever?

 

charley

 

Charles A. Seavey, Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
1200 Commercial St.
Emporia KS, 66801
800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct)
[log in to unmask]

Ranganathan Said It All!

 

--

 

Michelynn McKnight, PhD, AHIP

Associate Professor

School of Library and Information Science

Louisiana State University

269 Coates Hall

Baton Rouge, LA 70803

 

225-578-7411

 

 

 

Health Science Librarians: Doing better what they’ve always done well.

--_000_F0C0C6EE99D2D446BF06CADB3C598F38E3B7C8STINGRAYesuadds_-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2012 19:47:31 -0500 Reply-To: [log in to unmask] Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Samuel E Trosow <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Intelligence work? In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="Boundary_(ID_MQcME3iSCnk2lA2CPeGh/A)" --Boundary_(ID_MQcME3iSCnk2lA2CPeGh/A) Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7BIT Content-Disposition: inline Interesting! On 01/27/12, Glynn Harmon <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > > > > > > > > > > Hi Charley, > > > > I was a Navy carrier/land pilot who flew over 100 electronic > intelligence missions in the Far East during the Cold War during the > late 1950s--sometimes we had to go into enemy airspace. > > > > Later I was head communications and top secret control officer for > Mayport Naval Station (also a Naval Air Station) near Jacksonville, > Florida, where I did cryptographic work. > > > > Then in 1962 I was a Russian Naval Interpreter during the Cuban > Blockade operations on different destroyers, oilers, and cruisers, > where I turned around several Russian and other ships carrying > nuclear missiles into Cuba. I also vectored several Naval aircraft > on their intelligence missions over Cuba. > > > > I plan to digitize my Russian interpreter notes since they should be > declassified by now. > > > > That is about it! > > > > Glynn Harmon > > Professor > > School of Information > > > > > > > > n 1/24/2012 6:44 PM, Charles Seavey wrote: > > > > > > > > > > Anybody out there besides me and > > Brooke Shannon spent any time in intelligence work? Armed > > forces, CIA, whatever? > > > > > > > > > > charley > > > > > > > > > > Charles A. Seavey, Professor > > > > School of Library and Information Management > > > > Emporia State University > > > > 1200 Commercial St. > > > > Emporia KS, 66801 > > > > 800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct) > > > > [log in to unmask] > > > > > > > > Ranganathan Said It All! > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > -- Samuel E. Trosow, Associate Professor University of Western Ontario Faculty of Information & Media Studies / Faculty of Law 259 North Campus Bldg. London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (519) 661-2111 x88498 [log in to unmask] http://samtrosow.ca --Boundary_(ID_MQcME3iSCnk2lA2CPeGh/A) Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7BIT Content-Disposition: inline Interesting!


On 01/27/12, Glynn Harmon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
[log in to unmask]" class="iwcQuote" style="border-left: 1px solid #00F; padding-left: 13px; margin-left: 0;" type="cite">

Hi Charley,

I was a Navy carrier/land pilot who flew over 100 electronic intelligence missions in the Far East during the Cold War during the late 1950s--sometimes we had to go into enemy airspace.

Later I was head communications and top secret control officer for Mayport Naval Station (also a Naval Air Station) near Jacksonville, Florida, where I did cryptographic work.

Then in 1962 I was a Russian Naval Interpreter during the Cuban Blockade operations on different destroyers, oilers, and cruisers, where I turned around several Russian and other ships carrying nuclear missiles into Cuba. I also vectored several Naval aircraft on their intelligence missions over Cuba.

I plan to digitize my Russian interpreter notes since they should be declassified by now.

That is about it!

Glynn Harmon
Professor
School of Information



n 1/24/2012 6:44 PM, Charles Seavey wrote:

[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
Anybody out there besides me and Brooke Shannon spent any time in intelligence work? Armed forces, CIA, whatever?

charley

Charles A. Seavey, Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
1200 Commercial St.
Emporia KS, 66801
800-552-4770 (SLIM,) 620-341-5816 (direct)
[log in to unmask]

Ranganathan Said It All!

--
Samuel E. Trosow, Associate Professor
University of Western Ontario
Faculty of Information & Media Studies / Faculty of Law
259 North Campus Bldg. London, Ontario N6A 5B7
(519) 661-2111 x88498
[log in to unmask]
http://samtrosow.ca
--Boundary_(ID_MQcME3iSCnk2lA2CPeGh/A)-- ========================================================================Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 18:52:35 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Fw: New Faculty Majority Summit (fwd) MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="-559023410-851401618-1327794755=:12313" ---559023410-851401618-1327794755=:12313 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 18:02:15 -0500 From: susanm <[log in to unmask]> Reply-To: [log in to unmask] ----- Forwarded Message ----- >From: "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]> >To: [log in to unmask] >Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 2:26 PM >Subject: New Faculty Majority Summit > >Subject: New Faculty Majority Summit >From:    "Lee Skallerup Bessette" <[log in to unmask]> > >This Saturday (January 28) is the first ever Summit on Adjunct issues in >higher education, supported by the New Faculty Majority. > >You can view the day's schedule here: >http://www.nfmfoundation.org/National-Summit.html > >I'm writing to let you know that you can follow the event on twitter using >the hashtag #newfac12. Also, I will be live blogging the event over at >insidehighered.com. It will be on the front page all day tomorrow. > >I hope that you check it out. We're hoping to start some good things here. > >Lee Skallerup Bessette, PhD >Instructor, English >Morehead State University > > >Sent from my iPhone > > > ---559023410-851401618-1327794755=:12313-- ========================================================================Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 16:56:56 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Polly Withers <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Italy Field School 2012 =?windows-1252?Q?–_?= Paper Restoration MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----u763620_0340_4609_1381_964441227406" ------u763620_0340_4609_1381_964441227406 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252" Dear Colleague, I would like to inform you about our summer 2012 field school, the San Gemini Preservation Studies Program, now in its 13th year, which is dedicated to the preservation of cultural heritage and offers students the opportunity to study and travel in Italy. In particular, I would like to inform you about a course we offer on paper restoration: Introduction to Restoration of Paper in Books and Archival Documents* (4 Units): July 1st – July 28th This course is an introduction to the restoration of paper in books and archival documents. It gives students an understanding of the nature of paper as a material, its history and the evolution of its use over time. The focus is on paper as a support media for writing and printing. The course also familiarizes students with the structure of books and their bindings. Besides studying the nature of the material, the course investigates the most common agents of deterioration and the various approaches to restoration of paper. Along with the theoretical lectures, the program includes hands-on workshops comprising: exercises in traditional ways of paper making; testing, analyzing and identifying types of paper, inks, paints, pigments and printing techniques; disassembling books and their bindings, and; exercises using different techniques of paper restoration. The course will include a field project restoring paper documents from the San Gemini Historic Archives and a field trip to Fabriano. To learn more about this course, please review the syllabus, which you can visit our WEBSITE. If you know any students, scholars, or others interested in this type of study, please inform them about our program. We would appreciate it if you could list our program on your organization's website as an available educational resource. We have a 2012 flyer that you may wish to post on your department notice board or forward to interested parties. You can print this from our website, on our About Us page. Please let us know if you have any problem printing and we can email you the PDF. Thank you very much. Cordially, Polly Withers Program Coordinator San Gemini Preservation Studies Program If you no longer desire to receive news on our programs, please click on this link. ------u763620_0340_4609_1381_964441227406 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset="windows-1252"

Dear Colleague,

 

I would like to inform you about our summer 2012 field school, the San Gemini Preservation Studies Program, now in its 13th year, which is dedicated to the preservation of cultural heritage and offers students the opportunity to study and travel in Italy. In particular, I would like to inform you about a course we offer on paper restoration:

 

Introduction to Restoration of Paper in Books and Archival Documents* (4 Units):

July 1st – July 28th

 

This course is an introduction to the restoration of paper in books and archival documents. It gives students an understanding of the nature of paper as a material, its history and the evolution of its use over time. The focus is on paper as a support media for writing and printing. The course also familiarizes students with the structure of books and their bindings. 

 

Besides studying the nature of the material, the course investigates the most common agents of deterioration and the various approaches to restoration of paper. Along with the theoretical lectures, the program includes hands-on workshops comprising: exercises in traditional ways of paper making; testing, analyzing and identifying types of paper, inks, paints, pigments and printing techniques; disassembling books and their bindings, and; exercises using different techniques of paper restoration.

 

The course will include a field project restoring paper documents from the San Gemini Historic Archives and a field trip to Fabriano. To learn more about this course, please review the syllabus, which you can visit our WEBSITE.

 

If you know any students, scholars, or others interested in this type of study, please inform them about our program. We would appreciate it if you could list our program on your organization's website as an available educational resource.

 

We have a 2012 flyer that you may wish to post on your department notice board or forward to interested parties. You can print this from our website, on our About Us page. Please let us know if you have any problem printing and we can email you the PDF.

 

Thank you very much.

 

Cordially, Polly Withers

Program Coordinator

San Gemini Preservation Studies Program

 

If you no longer desire to receive news on our programs, please click on this link.

------u763620_0340_4609_1381_964441227406-- ========================================================================Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 20:28:52 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> Subject: RateMyProfessor.com MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"; format=flowed Greetings, A concerned jESSE reader brought this site to my attention privately and asked that I bring it to your attention for discussion. I have not found very many SIS faculty on this site, but I have found a few. The reader wonders how your institution handles such student evaluations on such a web site, and how these evaluations factor into tenure decisions and other faculty evaluations. The reader notes the differences between course choices by students (which these appear to be having writ large), and peer evaluations, but also notes that there is a connection between the two: if students don't sign up for your courses, that is going to have a bearing on your evaluation by peers. The reader also wonders how you as an individual and as an institution balance negative reviews ("He asked us to do too much work!!") with positive reviews ("She's really sexy", "He tells great jokes", "Attendance isn't mandatory because he posts his lectures online", "Easy!!, "Homework was not collected" "I only came on test days". I and the reader would appreciate your comments on this site. And I and the reader would appreciate your comments on such student evaluations of professorial performance. --gw <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired School of Information Sciences University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA [log in to unmask] http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/ jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 09:14:58 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Alison Miller <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Thoughts and examples of using Skype for Reference services MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="f46d0444ef6b08ff0004b7ab5c97" --f46d0444ef6b08ff0004b7ab5c97 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1" Hello all~ We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference. Do any have experience using this? What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference? I would like to add more examples and thoughts. Thank you in advance! Best~ Alison Miller Manager, ipl2 Reference Services Adjunct instructor Drexel University --f46d0444ef6b08ff0004b7ab5c97 Content-Type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Hello all~

We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference.  Do any have experience using this?  What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference?  I would like to add more examples and thoughts.  Thank you in advance!

Best~
Alison Miller

Manager, ipl2 Reference Services
Adjunct instructor
Drexel University
--f46d0444ef6b08ff0004b7ab5c97-- ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 12:09:52 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Anne Woodsworth <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Call for Proposals for Advances in Librarianship MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="f46d041826105b18f704b7adccbf" --f46d041826105b18f704b7adccbf Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Dear Colleagues, Dave Penniman and I, co-editors of *Advances in Librarianship,* and would like to receive chapter proposals for volume 36, to be published in 2013 on the theme of * **Mergers, Alliances, Collaborations, and Partnerships.* While corporate mergers make headlines, similar efforts in library and information science are less vociferously touted. They are occurring, however, amongst libraries, degree programs, and enterprises such as networks and consortia. Public libraries partner with community groups in order to strengthen the political clout of both. They are occurring as governments mandate consolidation of operations amongst agencies under their purview in order to reduce or curtail expenditures. Academic libraries are partnering with other internal units such as writing centers and externally with agencies such as research laboratories. They are also collaborating with peer institutions to develop resources in developing collections instead of competing and duplicating materials in their collections. North America has experienced increasing numbers of public library and museum collaborations as well as public library and school media centers partnerships. Regional networks have consolidated operations and become larger entities. This volume of Advances in Librarianship seeks to provide a comprehensive review of the factors that lead to mergers and other alliances, the methods used to ensure effective and successful collaborations, and descriptions of the factors which contributed to less successful efforts at consolidation. Original research, case studies, literature reviews and conceptual papers are sought as chapters for this volume. Topics of interest for proposed chapters can include, but are not limited to, the following: • Structural and operational mergers such as technical services and collection management in two or more library and information science environments; • The impact and benefits of expanding electronic tools such as social networks, and shared digital spaces such as Dropbox and Google Docs on blended or joint initiatives; • Experiences in higher education with combining programs and other educational experiences for students and faculty across disciplines and spanning two or more institutions; • The fiscal results of mergers and multi-institutional operations amongst groups of libraries of all kinds; • Policy, work reallocation and structural changes within merging operations; • Research about corporate experiences and the lessons or guidance they can provide for the not for profit sector; • Changes in workflow and organizational structures and other behavioral issues arising in merged organizations; • The lessons, successes and failures in creating teams across previously separate organizations; • Human resource implications and impact on unions in settings that have joint or merged services and operations; • Studies of the factors that stimulated formation of merged entities, alliances amongst diverse groups/entities. Proposals can be in the form of an abstract or an outline. Please submit chapter proposals to the Editors at * [log in to unmask]* <[log in to unmask]> or [log in to unmask] and *[log in to unmask] *or [log in to unmask] Questions and comments should be submitted via e-mail to us. *The due dates are:* For chapter proposal outlines: *April 1, 2012* For first drafts of chapters: *September 1, 2012* For final drafts of chapters after receipt of editorial comments: *December 1, 2012* --f46d041826105b18f704b7adccbf Content-Type: text/html; charset="windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Dear Colleagues,

Dave Penniman and I, co-editors of Advances in Librarianship, and would like to receive chapter proposals for volume 36, to be published in 2013 on the theme of Mergers, Alliances, Collaborations, and Partnerships.

 

While corporate mergers make headlines, similar efforts in library and information 

science are less vociferously touted. They are occurring, however, amongst libraries, degree programs, and enterprises such as networks and consortia. Public libraries partner with community groups in order to strengthen the political clout of both. They are occurring as governments mandate consolidation of operations amongst agencies under their purview in order to reduce or curtail expenditures. Academic libraries are partnering with other internal units such as writing centers and externally with agencies such as research laboratories. They are also collaborating with peer institutions to develop resources in developing collections instead of competing and duplicating materials in their collections. North America has experienced increasing numbers of public library and museum collaborations as well as public library and school media centers partnerships. Regional networks have consolidated operations and become larger entities. This volume of Advances in Librarianship seeks to provide a comprehensive review of the factors that lead to mergers and other alliances, the methods used to ensure effective and successful collaborations, and descriptions of the factors which contributed to less successful efforts at consolidation. Original research, case studies, literature reviews and conceptual papers are sought as chapters for this volume.

 

Topics of interest for proposed chapters can include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Structural and operational mergers such as technical services and collection management in two or more library and information science environments;

• The impact and benefits of expanding electronic tools such as social networks, and shared digital spaces such as Dropbox and Google Docs on blended or joint initiatives;

• Experiences in higher education with combining programs and other educational experiences for students and faculty across disciplines and spanning two or more institutions;

• The fiscal results of mergers and multi-institutional operations amongst groups of libraries of all kinds;

• Policy, work reallocation and structural changes within merging operations;

• Research about corporate experiences and the lessons or guidance they can provide for the not for profit sector;

• Changes in workflow and organizational structures and other behavioral issues arising in merged organizations;

• The lessons, successes and failures in creating teams across previously separate organizations;

• Human resource implications and impact on unions in settings that have joint or merged services and operations;

• Studies of the factors that stimulated formation of merged entities, alliances amongst diverse groups/entities.
 

Proposals can be in the form of an abstract or an outline.

Please submit chapter proposals to the Editors at [log in to unmask] or [log in to unmask] and [log in to unmask] or [log in to unmask]

Questions and comments should be submitted via e-mail to us.

The due dates are:

For chapter proposal outlines: April 1, 2012

For first drafts of chapters: September 1, 2012

For final drafts of chapters after receipt of editorial comments: December 1, 2012

--f46d041826105b18f704b7adccbf-- ========================================================================Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 19:12:03 -0800 Reply-To: Ben Richardson <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Ben Richardson <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: RateMyProfessor.com In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="-1597239680-1530199435-1327806723=:5057" ---1597239680-1530199435-1327806723=:5057 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable ________________________________ From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> To: [log in to unmask] Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 7:28 PM Subject: RateMyProfessor.com Greetings,   A concerned jESSE reader brought this site to my attention privately and asked that I bring it to your attention for discussion.   I have not found very many SIS faculty on this site, but I have found a few.   The reader wonders how your institution handles such student evaluations on such a web site, and how these evaluations factor into tenure decisions and other faculty evaluations.  The reader notes the differences between course choices by students (which these appear to be having writ large), and peer evaluations, but also notes that there is a connection between the two:  if students don't sign up for your courses, that is going to have a bearing on your evaluation by peers.   The reader also wonders how you as an individual and as an institution balance negative reviews ("He asked us to do too much work!!") with positive reviews ("She's really sexy", "He tells great jokes", "Attendance isn't mandatory because he posts his lectures online", "Easy!!, "Homework was not collected" "I only came on test days".   I and the reader would appreciate your comments on this site.   And I and the reader would appreciate your comments on such student evaluations of professorial performance.   --gw <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired School of Information Sciences University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA          [log in to unmask] http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/ jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> ---1597239680-1530199435-1327806723=:5057 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 7:28 PM
Subject: RateMyProfessor.com

Greetings,
  A concerned jESSE reader brought this site to my attention privately and asked that I bring it to your attention for discussion.
  I have not found very many SIS faculty on this site, but I have found a few.

  The reader wonders how your institution handles such student evaluations on such a web site, and how these evaluations factor into tenure decisions and other faculty evaluations.  The reader notes the differences between course choices by students (which these appear to be having writ large), and peer evaluations, but also notes that there is a connection between the two:  if students don't sign up for your courses, that is going to have a bearing on your evaluation by peers.
  The reader also wonders how you as an individual and as an institution balance negative reviews ("He asked us to do too much work!!") with positive reviews ("She's really sexy", "He tells great jokes", "Attendance isn't mandatory because he posts his lectures online", "Easy!!, "Homework was not collected" "I only came on test days".

  I and the reader would appreciate your comments on this site.

  And I and the reader would appreciate your comments on such student evaluations of professorial performance.

  --gw

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired
School of Information Sciences
University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA          [log in to unmask]
http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/
jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html
SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>



---1597239680-1530199435-1327806723=:5057-- ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 19:37:46 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: RateMyProfessor.com (fwd) MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"; format=flowed Rec'd with a technical glitch. --gw ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 15:52:26 -0500 From: Scott Barker <[log in to unmask]> To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Subject: RE: RateMyProfessor.com At the University of Washington Information School as it is elsewhere, teaching is an extremely important factor to consider when evaluating faculty for tenure and promotion (as is their research and service). Like most universities, student evaluations take place at the end of each course through an institutionally approved set of forms and processes. The evaluations are looked at by the chair of each program, our assistant dean for academics, and of our dean as part of the annual merit review process. For guest faculty those evaluations may be looked at more regularly, especially if the person is new to teaching for us. For faculty up for tenure and promotion, students and alumni are also asked to give additional feedback on teaching beyond the standard course evaluations. We are aware that students use sites like "RateMyProcessor.com" but we don't look at them as part of our standard processes. Some of our faculty look themselves however. Some like what they see and some don't as you'd expect. I'd also note that some of our very best teaching faculty occasionally will have a negative comment posted there, and they sometimes agonize too much over one negative statement. But that's good to me, because that shows how much they care. My PERSONAL opinion is that the vast majority of our faculty do a good job, and I don't object to sites like "RateMyProcessor". We have nothing to worry about. I am chair of our undergraduate program and I actually find very few students that like a faculty member because the "class was easy" or the professor tells good jokes. In general, when I look at our institutional student evaluations, for the most part students are very fair. The faculty that do the best on student evals are typically the best teaching faculty we have if I had to rate them myself. And it isn't because they are "easy". Instead it is because they are passionate, they get students excited about the material, they engage students, the class is well organized, their knowledge is up-to-date, they bring past professional and research experience into the classroom etc. This is harsh, but I'd suggest that if a faculty member is worried that most comments on "RateMyProfessor" are negative, they should look hard at themselves and the content of their course. Like I said, you can never please everyone in a class and everyone will get negative comments. But if the faculty member and the class routinely are evaluated poorly, the problem is not likely to be with "RateMyProfessor", it is likely to be with the class or instructor. Scott Barker Information School University of Washington -----Original Message----- From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gretchen Whitney Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 5:29 PM To: [log in to unmask] Subject: RateMyProfessor.com Greetings, A concerned jESSE reader brought this site to my attention privately and asked that I bring it to your attention for discussion. I have not found very many SIS faculty on this site, but I have found a few. The reader wonders how your institution handles such student evaluations on such a web site, and how these evaluations factor into tenure decisions and other faculty evaluations. The reader notes the differences between course choices by students (which these appear to be having writ large), and peer evaluations, but also notes that there is a connection between the two: if students don't sign up for your courses, that is going to have a bearing on your evaluation by peers. The reader also wonders how you as an individual and as an institution balance negative reviews ("He asked us to do too much work!!") with positive reviews ("She's really sexy", "He tells great jokes", "Attendance isn't mandatory because he posts his lectures online", "Easy!!, "Homework was not collected" "I only came on test days". I and the reader would appreciate your comments on this site. And I and the reader would appreciate your comments on such student evaluations of professorial performance. --gw <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired School of Information Sciences University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA [log in to unmask] http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/ jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 19:50:41 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: RateMyProfessor.com (fwd) MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="-559023410-851401618-1327882855=:16254" ---559023410-851401618-1327882855=:16254 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Rec'd with a technical glitch. --gw __________________________________________ > This paper from five years ago might be of interest: >   > Theodore Coladarci & Irv Kornfield. RateMyProfessors.com versus formal > in-class student evaluations of teaching. "Practical Assessment, Research and > Evaluation". Volume 12, Number 6, May 2007. See: http://bit.ly/znvcrG >   > Paper summarized in "Inside Higher Ed" at: http://bit.ly/yBc3Jj > > Bernie Sloan > > --- On Sat, 1/28/12, Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > > > From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> > Subject: RateMyProfessor.com > To: [log in to unmask] > Date: Saturday, January 28, 2012, 8:28 PM > > > Greetings, >   A concerned jESSE reader brought this site to my attention privately and > asked that I bring it to your attention for discussion. >   I have not found very many SIS faculty on this site, but I have found a > few. > >   The reader wonders how your institution handles such student evaluations on > such a web site, and how these evaluations factor into tenure decisions and > other faculty evaluations.  The reader notes the differences between course > choices by students (which these appear to be having writ large), and peer > evaluations, but also notes that there is a connection between the two:  if > students don't sign up for your courses, that is going to have a bearing on > your evaluation by peers. >   The reader also wonders how you as an individual and as an institution > balance negative reviews ("He asked us to do too much work!!") with positive > reviews ("She's really sexy", "He tells great jokes", "Attendance isn't > mandatory because he posts his lectures online", "Easy!!, "Homework was not > collected" "I only came on test days". > >   I and the reader would appreciate your comments on this site. > >   And I and the reader would appreciate your comments on such student > evaluations of professorial performance. > >   --gw > > <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> > Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired > School of Information Sciences > University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA           [log in to unmask] > http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/ > jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html > SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html > <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> > > > ---559023410-851401618-1327882855=:16254-- ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 19:52:47 -0500 Reply-To: [log in to unmask] Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Samuel E Trosow <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Thoughts and examples of using Skype for Reference services In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="Boundary_(ID_F+6mnbZqFzbxzGSe9213gg)" --Boundary_(ID_F+6mnbZqFzbxzGSe9213gg) Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: inline I'm glad to see that posts about substantive discussions in LIS classes are now admissible on the list! Samuel E. Trosow, Associate Professor University of Western Ontario Faculty of Information & Media Studies / Faculty of Law 259 North Campus Bldg. London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (519) 661-2111 x88498 [log in to unmask] http://samtrosow.ca On 01/29/12, Alison Miller <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > Hello all~ > > We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference.  Do any have experience using this?  What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference?  I would like to add more examples and thoughts.  Thank you in advance! > > > > Best~ > Alison Miller > > Manager, ipl2 Reference Services > Adjunct instructor > Drexel University > > > -- --Boundary_(ID_F+6mnbZqFzbxzGSe9213gg) Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: inline I'm glad to see that posts about substantive discussions in LIS classes are now admissible on the list!

Samuel E. Trosow, Associate Professor
University of Western Ontario
Faculty of Information & Media Studies / Faculty of Law
259 North Campus Bldg. London, Ontario N6A 5B7
(519) 661-2111 x88498
[log in to unmask]
http://samtrosow.ca

On 01/29/12, Alison Miller <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
[log in to unmask]" class="iwcQuote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(0, 0, 255); padding-left: 13px; margin-left: 0pt;" type="cite">
Hello all~

We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference.  Do any have experience using this?  What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference?  I would like to add more examples and thoughts.  Thank you in advance!

Best~
Alison Miller

Manager, ipl2 Reference Services
Adjunct instructor
Drexel University
--
--Boundary_(ID_F+6mnbZqFzbxzGSe9213gg)-- ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 20:16:24 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Alison Miller <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Thoughts and examples of using Skype for Reference services In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="f46d0444694380dd9f04b7b499a0" --f46d0444694380dd9f04b7b499a0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1" Thank you for the example. We have read articles and the students have been performing scanning exercises, but they have been discussing discrepancies in what they have read and what they are finding through the exercise. I thought that this would be a good place to ask others for examples and thoughts. I will share my outreach efforts and the results with the class. Best~ Alison On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 7:56 PM, Trevor A. Dawes <[log in to unmask]>wrote: > Alison, > > You are probably familiar with > https://www.library.ohiou.edu/ask/skype.html > > Trevor > > > Sent from a cloud > > On Jan 29, 2012, at 7:22 PM, "Alison Miller" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > > > Hello all~ > > > > We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on > Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference. Do any have > experience using this? What are your thoughts on using Skype for > Reference? I would like to add more examples and thoughts. Thank you in > advance! > > > > Best~ > > Alison Miller > > > > Manager, ipl2 Reference Services > > Adjunct instructor > > Drexel University > --f46d0444694380dd9f04b7b499a0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Thank you for the example. We have read articles and the students have been performing scanning exercises, but they have been discussing discrepancies in what they have read and what they are finding through the exercise.  I thought that this would be a good place to ask others for examples and thoughts.  I will share my outreach efforts and the results with the class.

Best~
Alison

On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 7:56 PM, Trevor A. Dawes <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Alison,

You are probably familiar with https://www.library.ohiou.edu/ask/skype.html

Trevor


Sent from a cloud

On Jan 29, 2012, at 7:22 PM, "Alison Miller" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hello all~
>
> We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference.  Do any have experience using this?  What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference?  I would like to add more examples and thoughts.  Thank you in advance!
>
> Best~
> Alison Miller
>
> Manager, ipl2 Reference Services
> Adjunct instructor
> Drexel University

--f46d0444694380dd9f04b7b499a0-- ========================================================================Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 20:35:32 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Jisue Lee <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Thoughts and examples of using Skype for Reference services In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 (Apple Message framework v1084) Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="Apple-Mail-11--459701889" --Apple-Mail-11--459701889 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="euc-kr" Hello, I am doctoral student at FSU and would like to share my experience in using Skype reference service. Last fall 2011, I was trying to do some search for my grad students taking virtual reference services. And I found out that the link (attached below) of Ohio University didn't work any more. I was talking with the librarians on Skype reference service in Ohio Univ. and the librarian said that they stopped the service due to the small number of users: students do not really attempt the skype reference over the regular chat service. Also, I talked with librarians at FSU on the availability of Skype ref service as well. They also told me that they lifted the service due to the lack of usage and attentions. I thought there's a gap between the potential of skype ref service we might overestimate the real use/demand in real life of reference service. I hope my experience will be helpful! If you need further information on my experience, feel free to contact me! Thanks. Jisue Jan 29, 2012, 8:16 PM, Alison Miller ÀÛ¼º: > Thank you for the example. We have read articles and the students have been performing scanning exercises, but they have been discussing discrepancies in what they have read and what they are finding through the exercise. I thought that this would be a good place to ask others for examples and thoughts. I will share my outreach efforts and the results with the class. > > Best~ > Alison > > On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 7:56 PM, Trevor A. Dawes <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > Alison, > > You are probably familiar with https://www.library.ohiou.edu/ask/skype.html > > Trevor > > > Sent from a cloud > > On Jan 29, 2012, at 7:22 PM, "Alison Miller" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > > > Hello all~ > > > > We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference. Do any have experience using this? What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference? I would like to add more examples and thoughts. Thank you in advance! > > > > Best~ > > Alison Miller > > > > Manager, ipl2 Reference Services > > Adjunct instructor > > Drexel University > --Apple-Mail-11--459701889 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset="euc-kr"
Hello, 

I am doctoral student at FSU and would like to share my experience in using Skype reference service. Last fall 2011, I was trying to do some search for my grad students taking virtual reference services. And I found out that the link (attached below) of Ohio University didn't work any more. 

I was talking with the librarians on Skype reference service in Ohio Univ. and the librarian said that they stopped the service due to the small number of users: students do not really attempt the skype reference over the regular chat service. 

Also, I talked with librarians at FSU on the availability of Skype ref service as well. They also told me that they lifted the service due to the lack of usage and attentions. 

I thought there's a gap between the potential of skype ref service we might overestimate the real use/demand in real life of reference service. 

I hope my experience will be helpful! 
If you need further information on my experience, feel free to contact me!

Thanks. 

Jisue



Jan 29, 2012, 8:16 PM, Alison Miller ÀÛ¼º:

Thank you for the example. We have read articles and the students have been performing scanning exercises, but they have been discussing discrepancies in what they have read and what they are finding through the exercise.  I thought that this would be a good place to ask others for examples and thoughts.  I will share my outreach efforts and the results with the class.

Best~
Alison

On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 7:56 PM, Trevor A. Dawes <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Alison,

You are probably familiar with https://www.library.ohiou.edu/ask/skype.html

Trevor


Sent from a cloud

On Jan 29, 2012, at 7:22 PM, "Alison Miller" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hello all~
>
> We are currently having a discussion in an advanced workshop class on Digital Reference Services about using Skype for reference.  Do any have experience using this?  What are your thoughts on using Skype for Reference?  I would like to add more examples and thoughts.  Thank you in advance!
>
> Best~
> Alison Miller
>
> Manager, ipl2 Reference Services
> Adjunct instructor
> Drexel University


--Apple-Mail-11--459701889-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 30 Jan 2012 12:47:50 +0800 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Shiao-Feng Su <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Tenure Track Faculty Positions at Graduate Institute of Library and Information Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan, R.O.C. MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0267_01CCDF4D.600751B0" ------=_NextPart_000_0267_01CCDF4D.600751B0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="big5" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Graduate Institute of Library and Information Science, National Chung Hsing University, TaiChung, Taiwan invites applicants and nominations for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant, Associate or Full Professor. 1. Qualification: Earned doctorate in library and information science. Preferred qualifications: demonstrated teaching excellence in an institution of higher education. 2. Required Documents: ¡P Copy of Ph.D. diploma, certification of work experience, and transcripts ¡P Copy of passport or the front and back of Identification Card of Republic of China ¡P Curriculum vitae ¡P Copy of TEACHER¡¦S CERTIFICATE (if any) ¡P A publication list of recent five years (published after January 1, 2007, doctoral dissertation included). ¡P Full text of one published work of first-named author. ¡P A list of courses taught or interested to teach with syllabi and bibliography. ¡P Names and contact information of two references 3. Finalists will be invited for an interview by our faculty and make a presentation to faculty and graduate students. The institute is not able to compensate on any cost. 4. Rank and date of appointment: Faculty rank is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Hiring date begins on August 1, 2012. 5. Deadline of application: February 10, 2012 6. How to apply: Please mail all documents to Dr. Shiao-Feng Su, Director, on or before February 10, 2012 by postage, indicating ¡§Faculty position application¡¨ on the envelope. Address: Address: 250, Kuo Kuang Rd., Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C. 402 Email: [log in to unmask] Tel: 886-4-2284-0815 ext18 Fax: 886-4-2287-1869 ------=_NextPart_000_0267_01CCDF4D.600751B0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="big5" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Graduate Institute of Library and Information Science, National Chung Hsing University, TaiChung, Taiwan invites applicants and nominations for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant, Associate or Full Professor.

1. Qualification:

Earned doctorate in library and information science. Preferred qualifications: demonstrated teaching excellence in an institution of higher education.

2. Required Documents:

¡P          Copy of Ph.D. diploma, certification of work experience, and transcripts

¡P          Copy of passport or the front and back of Identification Card of Republic of China

¡P          Curriculum vitae

¡P          Copy of TEACHER¡¦S CERTIFICATE (if any)

¡P          A publication list of recent five years (published after January 1, 2007, doctoral dissertation included).

¡P          Full text of one published work of first-named author.

¡P          A list of courses taught or interested to teach with syllabi and bibliography.

¡P          Names and contact information of two references

 

3.       Finalists will be invited for an interview by our faculty and make a presentation to faculty and graduate students. The institute is not able to compensate on any cost.

4.       Rank and date of appointment: Faculty rank is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Hiring date begins on August 1, 2012.

5.       Deadline of application: February 10, 2012

6.       How to apply:

Please mail all documents to Dr. Shiao-Feng Su, Director, on or before February 10, 2012 by postage, indicating ¡§Faculty position application¡¨ on the envelope.

Address:

Address: 250, Kuo Kuang Rd., Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C. 402

Email: [log in to unmask]

Tel: 886-4-2284-0815 ext18

Fax: 886-4-2287-1869

------=_NextPart_000_0267_01CCDF4D.600751B0-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 30 Jan 2012 19:02:26 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: "Sheri A. Massey" <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Literature Review Text In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="_000_CB4C98C452A9smasseyumdedu_" MIME-Version: 1.0 --_000_CB4C98C452A9smasseyumdedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Kate and Charles, I use a spreadsheet to write my own literature reviews. I am trying to communicate the concept and spreadsheet method to a student. So far we have been successful. It is my responsibility to help her work through the idea of a lit review and offer some guidance in writing one. In addition to the spreadsheet, I think a text of some sort would help. -SM ______________________ Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D. Lecturer College of Information Studies 4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing University of Maryland O: (301) 405-4580 F: (301) 314-9145 [log in to unmask][log in to unmask]> From: Katherine McCain <[log in to unmask]> Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2012 20:09:02 -0500 To: "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Literature Review Text Sheri and Charles, In one sense, there is a “best way” but it won’t be the kind of step-by-step approach that seems to be desired. * Consider a set of documents that discuss one or more themes on the subject of the review * You can model the documents as a matrix — each row is a document, each column is a topic potentially discussed by that document (this is not unlike a document/term matrix). * An annotated bibliography would “write across the rows” -- dealing with each document in turn. This is a way to write a very bad lit review * A better lit review would be to “write down the columns” -- taking up each theme in turn and discussing it with reference to the documents. Kate McCain On 1/20/12 11:00 PM, "Charles Hildreth" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: Sheri, There is no single "best" way of doing a literature review. Much depends on the aim, scope and length of the research study being reported. Also, different literature reviews have different purposes. If you want a recipe, I suggest you consult a cookbook. Then, again, there is no single best recipe for any dish or food offering, except, of course, my wife's. You write, "I wanted one that’s been tested among our group." I wonder, just who are the members of your group? Charles R. Hildreth, Ph.D. 146 Marks Avenue Lancaster, Ohio 43130 ________________________________ From: Sheri A. Massey <[log in to unmask]> To: [log in to unmask] Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 2:59 PM Subject: Literature Review Text Hello All, I am looking for a book or manual that walks a person through the steps of doing a literature review— very detailed, replicable steps. There are many lit review books available, but I wanted one that’s been tested among our group. Also, I am not looking for a complete guide to research, just something on literature reviews. Thanks in advance for your help! -SM ______________________ Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D. Lecturer College of Information Studies 4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing University of Maryland O: (301) 405-4580 F: (301) 314-9145 [log in to unmask] --_000_CB4C98C452A9smasseyumdedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Kate and Charles,

I use a spreadsheet to write my own literature reviews.  I am trying to communicate the concept and spreadsheet method to a student.  So far we have been successful.  It is my responsibility to help her work through the idea of a lit review and offer some guidance in writing one.   In addition to the spreadsheet, I think a text of some sort would help. 

-SM

______________________

Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D.

Lecturer

 

College of Information Studies

4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing

University of Maryland

O:  (301) 405-4580

F:   (301) 314-9145

[log in to unmask]" style="color: blue; text-decoration: underline; ">[log in to unmask]


From: Katherine McCain <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2012 20:09:02 -0500
To: "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Literature Review Text

Re: Literature Review Text
Sheri and Charles,

In one sense, there is a “best way” but it won’t be the kind of step-by-step approach that seems to be desired.
  • Consider a set of documents that discuss one or more themes on the subject of the review
  • You can model the documents as a matrix — each row is a document, each column is a topic potentially discussed by that document (this is not unlike a document/term matrix).
  • An annotated bibliography would “write across the rows” -- dealing with each document in turn. This is a way to write a very bad lit review
  • A better lit review would be to “write down the columns” -- taking up each theme in turn and discussing it with reference to the documents.

Kate McCain


On 1/20/12 11:00 PM, "Charles Hildreth" <[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Sheri,

There is no single "best" way of doing a literature review. Much depends on the aim, scope and length of the research study being reported. Also, different literature reviews have different purposes. If you want a recipe, I suggest you consult a cookbook. Then, again, there is no single best recipe for any dish or food offering, except, of course, my wife's. You write, "I wanted one that’s been tested among our group." I wonder, just who are the members of your group?
 
Charles R. Hildreth, Ph.D.
146 Marks Avenue
Lancaster, Ohio 43130

 
 

 


 From:
Sheri A. Massey <[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]>
 To: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
 Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 2:59 PM
 Subject: Literature Review Text
 

 
Hello All,

I am looking for a book or manual that walks a person through the steps of doing a literature review— very detailed, replicable steps.  There are many lit review books available, but I wanted one that’s been tested among our group.  Also, I am not looking for a complete guide to research, just something on literature reviews.

Thanks in advance for your help!

-SM

______________________
Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D.
Lecturer
  
College of Information Studies
4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing
University of Maryland
O:  (301) 405-4580
F:   (301) 314-9145
[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]


 

 
  

--_000_CB4C98C452A9smasseyumdedu_-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2012 07:54:38 -0600 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Michelynn McKnight <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Literature Review Text In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------030605070504000606060809" --------------030605070504000606060809 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Sometimes concept mapping also helps. MMcK On 1/30/2012 6:02 PM, Sheri A. Massey wrote: > Kate and Charles, > > I use a spreadsheet to write my own literature reviews. I am trying > to communicate the concept and spreadsheet method to a student. So > far we have been successful. It is my responsibility to help her work > through the idea of a lit review and offer some guidance in writing > one. In addition to the spreadsheet, I think a text of some sort > would help. > > -SM > > ______________________ > > Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D. > > Lecturer > > College of Information Studies > > 4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing > > University of Maryland > > O: (301) 405-4580 > > F: (301) 314-9145 > > [log in to unmask] > [log in to unmask]> > > > From: Katherine McCain <[log in to unmask] > > Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask] > > > Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2012 20:09:02 -0500 > To: "[log in to unmask] " > <[log in to unmask] > > Subject: Re: Literature Review Text > > Sheri and Charles, > > In one sense, there is a “best way” but it won’t be the kind of > step-by-step approach that seems to be desired. > > * Consider a set of documents that discuss one or more themes on the > subject of the review > * You can model the documents as a matrix — each row is a document, > each column is a topic potentially discussed by that document > (this is not unlike a document/term matrix). > * An annotated bibliography would “write across the rows” -- dealing > with each document in turn. This is a way to write a very bad lit > review > * A better lit review would be to “write down the columns” -- taking > up each theme in turn and discussing it with reference to the > documents. > > > Kate McCain > > > On 1/20/12 11:00 PM, "Charles Hildreth" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: > > Sheri, > > There is no single "best" way of doing a literature review. Much > depends on the aim, scope and length of the research study being > reported. Also, different literature reviews have different > purposes. If you want a recipe, I suggest you consult a cookbook. > Then, again, there is no single best recipe for any dish or food > offering, except, of course, my wife's. You write, "I wanted one > that’s been tested among our group." I wonder, just who are the > members of your group? > > Charles R. Hildreth, Ph.D. > 146 Marks Avenue > Lancaster, Ohio 43130 > > > > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > *From:*Sheri A. Massey <[log in to unmask]> > *To:* [log in to unmask] > *Sent:* Friday, January 20, 2012 2:59 PM > *Subject:* Literature Review Text > > > Hello All, > > I am looking for a book or manual that walks a person through > the steps of doing a literature review— very detailed, > replicable steps. There are many lit review books available, > but I wanted one that’s been tested among our group. Also, I > am not looking for a complete guide to research, just > something on literature reviews. > > Thanks in advance for your help! > > -SM > > ______________________ > Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D. > Lecturer > > College of Information Studies > 4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing > University of Maryland > O: (301) 405-4580 > F: (301) 314-9145 > [log in to unmask] > > > > > > > -- Michelynn McKnight, PhD, AHIP Associate Professor Schoolof Libraryand Information Science LouisianaState University 269 Coates Hall Baton Rouge, LA 70803 225-578-7411 /Health Science Librarians: Doing better what they’ve always done well./ --------------030605070504000606060809 Content-Type: text/html; charset="windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Sometimes concept mapping also helps.
MMcK

On 1/30/2012 6:02 PM, Sheri A. Massey wrote:
[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
Kate and Charles,

I use a spreadsheet to write my own literature reviews.  I am trying to communicate the concept and spreadsheet method to a student.  So far we have been successful.  It is my responsibility to help her work through the idea of a lit review and offer some guidance in writing one.   In addition to the spreadsheet, I think a text of some sort would help. 

-SM

______________________

Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D.

Lecturer

 

College of Information Studies

4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing

University of Maryland

O:  (301) 405-4580

F:   (301) 314-9145

[log in to unmask]" style="color: blue; text-decoration: underline; ">[log in to unmask]


From: Katherine McCain <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2012 20:09:02 -0500
To: "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Literature Review Text

Re: Literature Review Text
Sheri and Charles,

In one sense, there is a “best way” but it won’t be the kind of step-by-step approach that seems to be desired.
  • Consider a set of documents that discuss one or more themes on the subject of the review
  • You can model the documents as a matrix — each row is a document, each column is a topic potentially discussed by that document (this is not unlike a document/term matrix).
  • An annotated bibliography would “write across the rows” -- dealing with each document in turn. This is a way to write a very bad lit review
  • A better lit review would be to “write down the columns” -- taking up each theme in turn and discussing it with reference to the documents.

Kate McCain


On 1/20/12 11:00 PM, "Charles Hildreth" <[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Sheri,

There is no single "best" way of doing a literature review. Much depends on the aim, scope and length of the research study being reported. Also, different literature reviews have different purposes. If you want a recipe, I suggest you consult a cookbook. Then, again, there is no single best recipe for any dish or food offering, except, of course, my wife's. You write, "I wanted one that’s been tested among our group." I wonder, just who are the members of your group?
 
Charles R. Hildreth, Ph.D.
146 Marks Avenue
Lancaster, Ohio 43130

 
 

 


 From:
Sheri A. Massey <[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]>
 To: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
 Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 2:59 PM
 Subject: Literature Review Text
 

 
Hello All,

I am looking for a book or manual that walks a person through the steps of doing a literature review— very detailed, replicable steps.  There are many lit review books available, but I wanted one that’s been tested among our group.  Also, I am not looking for a complete guide to research, just something on literature reviews.

Thanks in advance for your help!

-SM

______________________
Sheri Anita Massey, Ph.D.
Lecturer
  
College of Information Studies
4117L Hornbake Library, South Wing
University of Maryland
O:  (301) 405-4580
F:   (301) 314-9145
[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]


 

 
  


--
Michelynn McKnight, PhD, AHIP

 

Michelynn McKnight, PhD, AHIP

Associate Professor

School of Library and Information Science

Louisiana State University

269 Coates Hall

Baton Rouge, LA 70803

 

225-578-7411

 

 

 

Health Science Librarians: Doing better what they’ve always done well.

--------------030605070504000606060809-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2012 08:37:53 -0600 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Frank Cervone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Second call - IFLA IT Section - Call for Papers on Disaster Planning and Recovery for Digital Libraries MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01CCE025.EA80857C" ------_=_NextPart_001_01CCE025.EA80857C Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Please excuse cross-postings Call for papers WORLD LIBRARY AND INFORMATION CONGRESS: 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly "Libraries Now! - Inspiring, Surprising, Empowering"" 11-17 August 2012, Helsinki, Finland Information Technology Section Theme: Continuity in the face of digital disasters: Disaster planning and recovery for digital libraries While much emphasis has been placed by libraries on developing digital collections and services, there have been few studies of how to keep these digital collections and services functioning in the case of a disaster or some other disruption to normal library operations. Whether due to natural or man-made events, advance planning for disruptions to services and collections is critical in our increasingly digital age. In response to this critical need, the Information Technology section is seeking proposals for papers on best practices and tools that relate to the facilitation, implementation, or planning for disaster recovery and business continuity of digital libraries. Areas of interest for papers include, but need not be restricted to, the following: * Developing effective disaster recovery and organizational continuity models * Implementing effective disaster recovery and continuity strategies for digital repositories * Minimizing risk in developing and implementing digital libraries * Solutions for promoting collaborative services to enable digital library continuity * New organizational models to support an emphasis on library organizational continuity * Case studies and lessons learned from successful efforts in recovering from a disaster Proposals for papers should be no more than one page in length. If selected, speakers will have 15 minutes to present their results and 5 minutes for a question and answer period during the conference session. Proposals should include the following information: - Name, title, and institution of speaker(s) - Title of proposed presentation - Address and email address of speaker(s) - Brief biographical statement about each speaker including information about the qualifications of the speaker to address the proposed topic - One or two paragraph discussion of the main points of the paper including an outline of the takeaways a conference attendee will obtain by having the topic presented at the conference - Language of presentation - Contact information for response to the proposal Proposals should be sent by 11 February, 2012 to Frank Cervone, secretary of the Information Technology Section at [log in to unmask] . The subject line of all submissions should be "IFLA ITS Proposal -" followed by your last name. For example, "IFLA ITS Proposal - Cervone" The contact person for each proposal will be informed by 10 March, 2012 whether their proposal has been accepted or not. Papers selected for inclusion in the program must be submitted in one the official languages of IFLA by 15 May, 2012. Please note: - The committee is looking for papers that present real-world solutions. Papers that focus on solutions that are usable in multiple library contexts will receive higher consideration for inclusion in the conference program. Papers that are strictly theoretical or inapplicable to other environmental contexts are less likely to be accepted for inclusion in the program. - Every paper accepted must be presented in person by one of the authors at the WLIC in Helsinki. - Authors are required to permit non-exclusive publication of papers chosen for this session on the IFLA website and digital library. Papers that are accepted but not presented in person at the conference will not be made available on the official conference website nor will they be considered for nomination as a best paper of the conference. - Authors of papers not chosen for the conference may be invited to submit their paper for publication in the IFLA IT section journal. - All speaker expenses, including registration for the conference, travel, accommodation, etc., are the responsibility of the authors/presenters. No financial support can be provided by IFLA. - A special invitation can be issued to authors/presenters to facilitate attendance if required. H. Frank Cervone, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor for Information Services and CIO Purdue University Calumet ------_=_NextPart_001_01CCE025.EA80857C Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Please excuse cross-postings

 

Call for papers

WORLD LIBRARY AND INFORMATION CONGRESS: 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly

“Libraries Now! - Inspiring, Surprising, Empowering"”

11-17 August 2012, Helsinki, Finland

 

Information Technology Section

Theme: Continuity in the face of digital disasters: Disaster planning and recovery for digital libraries

 

While much emphasis has been placed by libraries on developing digital collections and services, there have been few studies of how to keep these digital collections and services functioning in the case of a disaster or some other disruption to normal library operations. Whether due to natural or man-made events, advance planning for disruptions to services and collections is critical in our increasingly digital age.

 

In response to this critical need, the Information Technology section is seeking proposals for papers on best practices and tools that relate to the facilitation, implementation, or planning for disaster recovery and business continuity of digital libraries.

 

Areas of interest for papers include, but need not be restricted to, the following:

·         Developing effective disaster recovery and organizational continuity models

·         Implementing effective disaster recovery and continuity strategies for digital repositories

·         Minimizing risk in developing and implementing digital libraries

·         Solutions for promoting collaborative services to enable digital library continuity

·         New organizational models to support an emphasis on library organizational continuity

·         Case studies and lessons learned from successful efforts in recovering from a disaster

 

Proposals for papers should be no more than one page in length. If selected, speakers will have 15 minutes to present their results and 5 minutes for a question and answer period during the conference session.

 

Proposals should include the following information:

 

-      Name, title, and institution of speaker(s)

-      Title of proposed presentation

-      Address and email address of speaker(s)

-      Brief biographical statement about each speaker including information about the qualifications of the speaker to address the proposed topic

-      One or two paragraph discussion of the main points of the paper including an outline of the takeaways a conference attendee will obtain by having the topic presented at the conference 

-      Language of presentation

-      Contact information for response to the proposal

 

Proposals should be sent by 11 February, 2012 to Frank Cervone, secretary of the Information Technology Section at [log in to unmask]. The subject line of all submissions should be “IFLA ITS Proposal –“ followed by your last name. For example, “IFLA ITS Proposal – Cervone”

 

The contact person for each proposal will be informed by 10 March, 2012 whether their proposal has been accepted or not. Papers selected for inclusion in the program must be submitted in one the official languages of IFLA by 15 May, 2012.

 

Please note:

-      The committee is looking for papers that present real-world solutions. Papers that focus on solutions that are usable in multiple library contexts will receive higher consideration for inclusion in the conference program. Papers that are strictly theoretical or inapplicable to other environmental contexts are less likely to be accepted for inclusion in the program.

-      Every paper accepted must be presented in person by one of the authors at the WLIC in Helsinki.

-      Authors are required to permit non-exclusive publication of papers chosen for this session on the IFLA website and digital library. Papers that are accepted but not presented in person at the conference will not be made available on the official conference website nor will they be considered for nomination as a best paper of the conference.

-      Authors of papers not chosen for the conference may be invited to submit their paper for publication in the IFLA IT section journal.

-      All speaker expenses, including registration for the conference, travel, accommodation, etc., are the responsibility of the authors/presenters. No financial support can be provided by IFLA.

-      A special invitation can be issued to authors/presenters to facilitate attendance if required.

 

H. Frank Cervone, Ph.D.

Vice Chancellor for Information Services and CIO

Purdue University Calumet

 

 

------_=_NextPart_001_01CCE025.EA80857C-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2012 12:06:47 -0800 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Nicole Purviance <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Mark Your Calendar for the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0053_01CCE010.CEE5FFA0" ------=_NextPart_000_0053_01CCE010.CEE5FFA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Meet Online October 3-5 for Library 2.012 As information professionals from all around the world digest the wealth of information shared during the inaugural Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference, a second round of inspiration is underway with the announcement of the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference ! Save the dates of October 3-5, 2012, for an inspiring global conversation about the future of libraries. The fully online Library 2.012 Conference will be held in multiple time zones, available in multiple languages, and feature multiple tracks. The conference is sure to be brimming with knowledge as information professionals worldwide meet online for this free forum. Sign up for conference news and updates at Library2012.com . In the meantime, if you missed one of the 160 presentations given at the Library 2.011 Conference, don’t worry. We understand that you had to sleep at some point during the 24-hour, two-day conference! All the presentations were recorded and can be accessed on the Library 2.0 website. The San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science is a founding partner of Library 2.011 and Library 2.012 conferences. The nationally-ranked school offers two fully online master’s degrees, a fully online certificate program, and a doctoral program: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS), Master of Archives and Records Administration (MARA), Post-Master’s Certificate in Library and Information Science, and the San José Gateway PhD Program. Learn more at: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science One Washington Square San Jose, California 95192-0029 ------=_NextPart_000_0053_01CCE010.CEE5FFA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Meet Online October 3-5 for Library 2.012

 

As information professionals from all around the world digest the wealth of information shared during the inaugural Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference, a second round of inspiration is underway with the announcement of the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference

 

Save the dates of October 3-5, 2012, for an inspiring global conversation about the future of libraries. The fully online Library 2.012 Conference will be held in multiple time zones, available in multiple languages, and feature multiple tracks. The conference is sure to be brimming with knowledge as information professionals worldwide meet online for this free forum. Sign up for conference news and updates at Library2012.com.

 

In the meantime, if you missed one of the 160 presentations given at the Library 2.011 Conference, don’t worry. We understand that you had to sleep at some point during the 24-hour, two-day conference! All the presentations were recorded and can be accessed on the Library 2.0 website.

 

The San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science is a founding partner of Library 2.011 and Library 2.012 conferences. The nationally-ranked school offers two fully online master’s degrees, a fully online certificate program, and a doctoral program: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS), Master of Archives and Records Administration (MARA), Post-Master’s Certificate in Library and Information Science, and the San José Gateway PhD Program. Learn more at: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu

 

 

 

 

San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science

One Washington Square

San Jose, California 95192-0029

------=_NextPart_000_0053_01CCE010.CEE5FFA0-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2012 20:13:43 -0500 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <[log in to unmask]> From: Gretchen Whitney <[log in to unmask]> Subject: understanding electronic communities MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"; format=flowed Greetings, I note the recent enthusiasm for talking about library services and IT concerns in providing them.. This is not the focus for the jESSE list - the 2,000 readers of jESSE are concerned about LIS education in the context of higher education in the US, and abroad. We are not concerned about specific IT applications for providing library services, as the URL in my sig file describes. I have no idea what happened to AUTOCAT (for catalogers), LIBREF (for strange reference questions) or the many other discussion lists devoted to library services in the early days of the Internet and Web. I have no idea what happened to Web4LIB, which tried to apply the Web to library services. I have no idea who (or how) librarians are trying to apply social media to library services, or where these discussions would be announced. While this discussion list (jESSE) survives, it is not concerned with specific library services in any media. Sneaky workaround: "I am teaching an introductory course in LIS for my university's masters program, and know that I have to deal with social media. How are you balancing participation in these services such as Twitter and Facebook and LinkedIn with the individual student's needs for privacy?" In the late 1990s, it was easy for a student to set up a web page and keep it fairly private as a student because there was no general access. In social media, the students have to participate in public to gain the experience with these media. How do you balance the need for private learning and public exposure?" Sneaky workaround No. 2: "I am teaching an elective course in LIS for my university's masters program in reference services, and I wish to evaluate the different media through which patrons can contact an information service to ask a question. Can anyone provide me with a framework for the evaluation of options for communication to ask a question available to patrons (telephone, e-mail, twitter, our web page, electronic discussion lists connected to our library, discussion boards connected to our library, Skype, personal appointments in person, personal walk-ins)? The emphasis is on the framework for evaluation, and less on the individual capabilities of these tools. Once the framework for evaluation is established, individual capabilities of tools within these categories can be evaluated." IT applications for library services are of deep concern for provision of services both to students and to the public. Let me point you elsewhere for such discussions. I do note that the American Library Association has adopted the Sympa communication software via e-mail for discussion lists, at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/communicate/emaildiscussionlists/index.cfm and ALA offers a whole cafeteria of discussion lists by subject and ALA organizations at http://lists.ala.org/sympa which includes reference services, cataloging and classification, and legislation, and library management. I would strongly encourage jESSE readers who have interests in these specific library practices to participate in and encourage the development of these community resources within the ALA. This is where these interests in specific library practices belong (AFAICT), as well as whatever discussion groups are offered by the Special Libraries Assn, Medical, Music, Theological, and other specialized assns are participating in the development of electronic communities for their members. I am not saying that any one participant is limited to belonging to one discussion list. Of course not. But I would ask that readers place their questions and concerns in the most appropriate discussion list. I would ask that you separate your social needs (you took a nap today and had a banana) from your professional needs (you wonder if you can undertake a project that your are interested in) from your philosophical needs (you wonder why consistent spelling in the English language is important). The point here is to encourage you to find your community(ies) which share your concerns, and place your questions there. This is not to stamp out your enthusiasm for finding a community of professional readers in which you share an interest. It is rather to encourage you to find a community in which you share interests, via jESSE, the American Library Association, or Facebook, Twitter, or whatever medium fits your social, professional, or intellectual interests, and learn and abide by the rules of those communities. . --gw <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> Gretchen Whitney, PhD, Retired School of Information Sciences University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA [log in to unmask] http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/ jESSE:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html SIGMETRICS:http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/sigmetrics.html <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>